Clubs

Champions Tour, LPGA top players visit Oregon this week

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Senior PGA players duel for major title
By Cliff Pfenning, oregonsports.com

The week after the drama of the PGA Championships, the golf world will focus on Oregon as both the PGA Champions Tour and LPGA Tour descend on the state.

Many of the world's biggest names from the Champions Tour will be at Crosswater Club at Sunriver for The Jeld-Wen Tradition, while the top women's players are at Pumpkin Ridge in North Plains for the Safeway Classic

The Jeld-Wen Tradition, one of the Champions Tour majors, will play out on NBC Saturday and Sunday.

The Safeway Classic is a 54-hole tournament.

Among the players scheduled to compete in The Jeld-Wen Tradition are Tom Watson, Corey Pavin, Nick Price and Bernhard Langer, who has won two-straight majors and is leading the Champions Tour points standings. Langer won the Senior British Open and U.S. Senior Open this year.

Defending champion Mike Reid is among the top candidates as tournament favorites.

The Safeway Classic is headed by Cristie Kerr, who won the LPGA Championship, and Yani Tseng, who won both the Kraft Nabisco Championships and Women's British Open.

Class of 1963 still rates as state's best

Four of the state champion wrestlers went on to international glory
By Cliff Pfenning, Oregonsports Journal

There are few years - in any state - when a group of high school wrestling champions go on to future greatness at the national and international level more than Oregon saw in 1963.

This year marks the 57th anniversary of a group that included two future World Champions, and three future Olympians - one of whom played in the NFL for a season.

And, the year also included the first cultural exchange team from the state to go abroad - to Japan for a monthlong tour.

Rick Sanders, then a senior at Lincoln, Henk Schenk, then a senior at Silverton, Fred Fozzard, a junior at Marshall, and Jess Lewis, a sophomore at Cascade all won titles in 1963.

All would go on to national and then international success on the mat, and on the football field with Lewis’ career at Oregon State and into the NFL.

 

Badminton works way into metro mentality

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Portland Badminton Club looks at a second facility
By Cliff Pfenning, oregonsports.com

In less than two years, competitive badminton has taken hold in the Portland metro area that the lone professional club is looking to expand.

Ralph Cervantes, who opened the Portland Badminton Club in 2009, recently said he’s looking at opportunities for a second club.

“We’ve had great response at our club at all levels,” Cervantes said. “We’re actually starting to outgrow our current facility and that makes it somewhat necessary to look for a second site.

“Badminton is a growth sport in Portland.”

The Portland Badminton Club is located in Hillsboro, close to the Intel campus, where most of the players work. But, enough players, especially those in younger competitive age-groups, have become members, that Cervantes has begun to investigate a second club.

Badminton, which is an Olympic sport, has organized clubs at several in-state colleges and universities. The PBC has sponsored several tournaments that have attracted regional competitors.

For more information on the Portland Badminton Club, visit www.portlandbadmintonclub.com.

 

 

Timbers, Thorns made some memories in 2019

Portland got an entertainment overload even without a title
By Cliff Pfenning

In early May, Brian Fernandez arrived at Portland International Airport and was greeted by an anonymous person, who stood next to him, lit up with a big smile and had someone take a photo of them together. 

Fernandez, a 24-year-old Argentinian, had just been signed by the Portland Timbers from his team in Mexico’s Liga MX, wore a long-sleeve shirt, faded jeans, and hat and had a guarded look on his face as if to say, “who are you? And are with the team?” 

Then more people showed up for photos, and then more. As the photos progressed, Fernandez seemed to figure out these were fans and he just landed in a hotspot of soccer fandom - and his face lit up, too. Soon, Fernandez started showing up on social media with a beaming smile when anyone noticed him and asked for a selfie. And, why not? Portland loved him and he performed.

Fernandez had one of the all-time great introductions to a new team starting slightly more than a week later. Having arrived on May 6 after the team paid an estimated $10 million for his rights, he scored his first goal May 15 after being inserted late in the match at Houston. Then, he scored again - twice - in the next match, and again in the next match. Fernandez scored in this first five Major League Soccer matches, something that had not been done since the league began in 1996, and added scores in two US Open Cup matches giving him nine goals in his first seven appearances in a Timbers kit.

Portland vaulted from being just a team to a contender for another trip to a league final, something it did just last year. But, then all the optimism came crashing down. Fernandez stopped scoring in every game and ended the season in substance-abuse rehab. Emotional sideline outbursts lit up social media, as did rumors of contract negotiations. And, of course, there was the Iron Front, which led the Timbers Army into a national discussion of civil liberties. That was the Timbers.

The Thorns, the women’s side of the franchise, were equally dramatic starting with the Women’s World Cup. The team had four players on the winning US side, which vaulted into nation attention for its success and dispute with USA Soccer over equal pay with the much-less successful men’s team. 

Portland led the National Women’s Soccer League for much of the season and seemed headed for another trip to a final and third league title when suddenly it stopped scoring, and closed out its season with a half-hearted loss in the first round of the playoffs.

Both the Timbers and Thorns lost their first playoff match and had their seasons close out this past weekend. As the playoffs head toward crowning league champions, Portland fans will only be able to follow from afar. And yet, it was not a boring year. 

The 2019 season might have been the most memorable, at least in terms of story-telling, since the franchise initially arrived in 1975 and led fans to claim the monicker of “Soccer City, USA.” In fact, that 1975 team was inducted into the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in September.

If the goal of a sports team is entertainment, the 2019 season for the Timbers and Thorns might be the most entertaining for any team that’s not going to win a league title. Fernandez arrived, Diego Chara finally played in a league All-Star Game, Diego Valeri reached the 70-70 mark and Steve Clark played stellar in goal in a season that started with 12-straight road matches. And the Thorns had the thrill of the World Cup and an early-season rise to the top of the league in spite of all those road matches only to slide in a historic level.

And, there was the Iron Front.

It all started March 2 in Denver, where so much snow landed on the field the second half had to be stopped to dig out the lines so everyone could see where the field ended. The match started at 18 degrees - the coldest in league history. Portland led 3-2 and had a man advantage in extra time, but the Rapids scored to force a 3-3 draw leading Timbers fans to snap their fingers and think what could have been with just a little more defense. 

The Denver result was a huge missed opportunity because the team lost its next five matches and was at the bottom of the league with just one point after six weeks.

The switch to Clark in goal seemed to start a turnaround. Portland won its next three matches as rumors of the Fernandez deal swirled across the land. Then he landed and the franchise really took off and the team rose to as high as No. 5 in some weekly power rankings. And then they started playing at home after the $85 million expansion of Providence Park finally finished up. Fans in the Timbers Army began arriving at the stadium half a day ahead of matches to be allowed in an extra 30 minutes early, continuing the city’s love affair with the franchise. All those home matches, though - 17 of the remaining 22, led to a thought of the players becoming complacent. The Army wasn’t complacent.

With politics sweeping the nation ahead of the 2020 Election, the league’s ban on political signage hit the Army due to its support of a symbol from 1930s Germany. The Iron Front, three arrows pointing downward diagonally, represented a group that opposed facist Nazis until 1933. The symbol, being waved on flags across the North end of the stadium, drew the league’s ire, especially after politicians in Washington starting deeming anti-facists as terrorists because of the violence that often erupted when they showed up to events organized by White Nationalists.  

With the team, somewhat incredibly, banning fans from matches, all manners of protests were tossed about on social media, from just not showing up, to walking out, to not purchasing concessions. Eventually, it turned into a silent protest for the first 33 minutes of the Aug. 23 match with rival Seattle, which included Seattle fans. Being televised by FOX, the stadium had never been as quiet. 

A month later, the league relented and eased its policy on fan support to allow for the Iron Front.

The protest received national attention, but it also received on-field attention as the team lost 2-1 and social media lit up because owner Merritt Paulson apparently cussed the fans out - linking the protest to the loss. 

The Timbers were potentially headed for as high as second place in the Western Conference, but a late-season collapse halted that dream. Portland finished the season with one win and three draws in its last six matches - just six points of a possible 18, and missed second place by just seven points, falling all the way to six instead.

A 2-1 loss at Real Salt Lake ended the season, Oct. 19.

Still, Chara, perhaps the team’s most revered player, played in his first All-Star Game in his ninth season in the league.

Valeri, the league’s MVP just two seasons ago, reached the level of 70 goals and 70 assists, becoming only the ninth player in league history to accomplish that feat. 

And, Clark, who started the season as the back-up to Jeff Attinella, had two entries on the online Save of the Year ballot - the lone keeper to have two entries.

The original Timbers, the 1975 squad of 17 primarily British players that reached the NASL final in its inaugural season, received a spot in the Hall, Sept. 24. The five members on hand for the ceremony at the Multnomah Athletic Club, noted the season was highly memorable for the fan support - two playoff crowds topped 30,000 fans, and the length of the season - 10 weeks by their memories. The regular season actually lasted 14 weeks, May 2 through August 9 for a 22-match schedule. To save money, the team’s East Coast road swing lasted nine days: four matches in nine days, including matches in Hartford, Conn., and Boston on consecutive days (played before crowds of 2,582 and 1,518, respectively).

The Thorns set an attendance record for their 2019 campaign, closing with an average of 20,098 fans per game - better than more than half of MLS teams. The World Cup buzz might have had something to do with that as four of the team’s starters: Tobin Heath, Lindsey Horan, Emily Sonnet and Adrianna Franch, helping the US win the Cup, closing with a 2-0 win over The Netherlands, July 7. 

The Thorns had five other players in the tournament as well, including team captain Christine Sinclair.

Portland opened the season with its bevy of international players and scored eight goals in its first three matches before the World Cup called for talent at the start of May. The Thorns had three wins, a pair of draws and just one loss in the six road matches it played before opening at home, June 2, with a 3-0 win over Chicago. With 11 of its remaining 17 matches at home, the team was on fire.

When the US starters returned for a July 24 home match with Houston, magic erupted in a 5-0 victory before 22,329 fans. The Thorns closed out August with a 3-0 home win over Chicago and had 10 wins, six draws and only three losses for the season. Then, the goals ended. 

Over the remaining six weeks, the Thorns scored just one goal and managed to rack up only four points in the standings from a potential 15. Meanwhile, North Carolina, the defending league champion, won eight of its final nine matches, a stretch that included a 6-0 win over Portland, and finished first in the league standings for the third consecutive year.

With a 1-0 loss at Chicago, Sunday, the season came to a halt, leading into much-needed discussion of the future of the women’s game. In the NWSL, that includes league sponsors (Budweiser became the official beer sponsor), media rights and expansion franchises, one of which is due for Louisville, Ky., in 2021. And, the US women’s team salaries.

Put altogether, FC Portland had a truly memorable year, without winning a title.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oregon Sports HOF inducts next class

Ashton Eaton heads list of in-state greats

Ashton Eaton, the 2012 and 2016 Gold Medalist in the decathlon, and his wife Brianne, Theisen-Eaton, headed the list of inductees to the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in a ceremony conducted at the Multnomah Athletic Club, Sept. 19.

National championship teams from Oregon State and the University of Portland, long-time football coach Thurman Bell and adaptive sports legene Aaron Paulson were also inducted.

The inductees were:

Ashton Eaton, two-time Olympic Decathlon gold medalist and five-time World Champion

Brianne Theisen-Eaton, Olympic Heptathlon medalist and World Champion

Thurman Bell, Roseburg High School football coach (second in all-time wins)

2002 University of Portland Women’s Soccer Team, NCAA champions 

Aaron Paulson, Adaptive sports paralympic swimming gold medalist

2006-2007 Oregon State University Mens Baseball Team, College World Series champions.

This year’s ceremony also featured a special tribute to Harry Glickman, a 1986 Hall of Fame inductee and acknowledged “father” of professional sports in Oregon. Early on, Glickman was responsible for bringing a number of NFL pre-season exhibition games to Portland’s then Multnomah Stadium. In 1960, he founded the Portland Buckaroos, WHL hockey club. In 1970, he won the expansion franchise for the Portland Trailblazers professional basketball team, and served as the team’s president from 1987-1994.

Each year the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame helps preserve Oregon’s rich sports heritage through its recognition of outstanding Oregon athletes and special contributors to sport.

In addition, Oregon Sports Hall of Fame college scholarships of $3,000 each, made possible by contributions from the MacTarnahan Family Trust, awarded to six student-athletes to be used for continuing their education at Oregon colleges and universities.

This years list included:

Hunter Knox – Harrisburg high school

Aaron Alexander – Molalla high school

Cody Stahl – Dayton high school

Fayth Dunn – Neah-Kah-Nie high school

Katelyn Lester – McNary high school

Tia Lohman – Beaverton high school.

 

Portland begins parks review

Portland looking for more than $3 million in cuts for next budget
By Cliff Pfenning, Oregonsports.com

PORTLAND - The annual process of cutting funds for Portland parks began Thursday as Portland Parks and Recreation Director Mike Abbaté addressed a crowd of more than 100 citizens who gathered in the Gateway neighborhood to learn more about where the money actually goes and what the most valuable things are.

"It's the start of our annual budget process," Abbaté said. "We have a group of five advisors who meet many times for about six months to develop our budget, but these public meetings are very important to that process."

Portland City Commissioner Amanda Fritz also spoke at the meeting, which lasted several hours, and included areas with translators in Vietnamese and Russian.

The PP&R budget of $62 million is looking at a five percent cut - just over $3. Attendees were given a 11x18 sheet with significant details on where the funds come from and are directed, split into three segments: Asset Management, Land Stewardship and Recreation.

 

 

 

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Bellotti, Stoudamire head Class of 2015

Annual Oregon Sports Hall of Fame set to induct six individuals, one team
Nov. 10, 2015 / Oregonsports.com

Coaching great Mike Bellotti and basketball star Damon Stoudamire are among the Class of 2015 set to be inducted to the Oregon Sports Hall of Fame in November. The annual ceremony is set to take place at the Multnomah Athletic Club, Nov. 19.

The Class includes long-time boys basketball coach Mike Doherty, UO running great Leann Warren, official Jack Folliard, football pioneer Elmer Kolberg and the 2000 Oregon State football team.

Bellotti succeeded Rich Brooks as coach of the Oregon football program and guided the Ducks to a record 116 wins against 55 losses. He is credited with building the program in to a national title contender, and the team followed with two appearances in the national title game following his move to become athletic director in 2009.

Stoudamire followed a stellar career at Portland's Wilson High School with a standout career at the University of Arizona and a 13-year career in the NBA that included six seasons with the Portland Trail Blazers

Mike Doherty is among the state's winningest boys basketball coach over five decades, and led McNary of Salem to the state title in 1968, Corvallis to a pair of titles (1980, '84) and Oregon City to the final in 2008.

Elmer Kolberg – An all-conference basketball and football player at Oregon State, Kolberg played two seasons for the Philadelphia Eagles and one for the Pittsburgh Steelers before entering the service in 1942. At OSU, he played three seasons for both basketball and football teams, and was named to the East-West Shrine Game in 1938. He was reputed to have set a conference record for personal fouls in a season while on the OSU basketball team.

Folliard is among the nation's most accomplished officials, and has regularly appeared on television as the head official of major games in the Pac-12 Conference. He is the head of the Oregon Athletic Officials Association.

Leann Warren was one of the University of Oregon's first female running stars, competing at the top national and international level in the early 1980s in both cross country and track and field in middle distances. She still holds the school record in the 1,500 meters and mile.

The 2000 Oregon State football team won a school-record 11 games and beat Notre Dame 41-9 in the Fiesta Bowl to finish the season ranked No. 4 in the nation - having started the season unranked. The team's lone loss was to Washington, 33-30, which helped the Huskies finish No. 3 in the nation.

 

 

Docherty, Stoll net amateur titles

College golfers dominate 106th Oregon Amateur Golf Championships
June 27, 2015

ALOHA - Alistair Docherty of Vancouver, Wash. and Beaverton’s Gigi Stoll captured titles in the 106th annual Oregon Amateur Golf Championships Saturday at The Reserve Vineyard & Golf.

Docherty beat Dylan Wu of Medford 2 & 1 for the men’s title.

Stoll beat Madison Odiorne of Bend 8 & 6 to defend her title.

In the men’s final, Docherty, a Chico State junior, jumped out to an early lead with birdies on two of the first four holes before bogeys on the next two holes allowed his opponent, a sophomore at Northwestern University, to get the match back to all square.

Wu began to take control of the match with a stretch of five birdies in six holes during the first 18 holes of the match before Docherty made two birdies on 16 & 17. Wu took the 18th hole to finish 4 Up at the conclusion of the first 18 holes of the match.

As they teed off in the afternoon on the 1st hole after a short break, Docherty again started hot with an eagle on the 515-yard par five 19th hole and won the 20th hole as well. It took Docherty until the 30th hole to get the match back to all square, before taking two of the next three holes on his way to a 2 & 1 victory and the title

In the Women’s final, Stoll began her journey toward the title with birdies on the first & fifth holes to take a 2 Up lead before Odiorne, a four-time OSAA state champion, scored a birdie on the par-five sixth hole. Stoll’s steady, consistent play saw her to continue to add to her lead with a birdie on 14 where the match stayed until they finished the first 18 holes.

Odiorne then birdied the par-five 19th hole for the last hole she’d win for the day. Stoll’s consistency lead her to win holes 20 and 21 with pars before birdieing holes 24, 27 and 30 on the way to her 8 & 6 win.

Both players are set to begin their collegiate careers in the Fall where Stoll will attend the University of Arizona and Odiorne will attend Washington State.

 

BASEBALL

Amateur leagues throughout Oregon

American Legion

Babe Ruth / Cal Ripken

Junior Baseball Organization

Little League

Northwest Independent Baseball League

Willamette Valley Men's Baseball League

West Coast League - College

 

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